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Locked Out, Locked Down

What if you sat down to your computer one morning and you entered your password to unlock your computer and you found a message stating you entered the wrong password?

What if your head was foggy? What if you had a brain gas? What if you lacked a good night’s sleep and was still tired, maybe even confused? You make mistakes. You are human.

What if something interfered with your immediate memory?

Perhaps a neurological disorder? Old age?

What if nothing was wrong other that you failed to activate the proper case?

What if you had Caps Lock on and it should be off?

What if Caps Lock should be on and it is off?

What if something silly happens like you typed too fast and miss keystrokes, striking the wrong key and subsequently some other key than the intended key is struck, subsequently the wrong password is entered?

What if times a thousand, maybe a million different reasons something could go wrong and as the old-aged adage of Murphy’s Law said, “Anything that can go wrong will go wrong”. And it did go wrong?

“Anything that can go wrong will go wrong.”

~Murphy’s Law

So, making mistakes is being human.

As my father used to tell me when I was young, shortly before he died, “Any man can make a mistake, no man ought to make the same mistake twice.” Of course, in today’s generation the gender complex would change the statement or quote slightly and substitute people for man. The meaning is the same. We all learn from our mistakes. Well, don’t we?

In reality, mistakes are the best things that happen to us because we learn from them.

But what if when you sat down to your computer, the computer informs you that if you fail so many times in entering the correct password, say three or maybe even ten times, then your computer is locked out permanently and no matter what you or anyone else does, your computer will forever be locked and your entire life of information inside that computer, a device that holds your life’s most personal content, is forever lost? What if?

What would you do? Besides blowing a head gasket what would you truly do?

You’d become furious. Most likely.

You would be angry. Who would you be angry with? You or the computer designer, or the one who controls your computer, who obviously is NOT you?

This exact scenario recently happened to me, not with my computer, or personal PC, but with my Smartphone. A Cricket Wireless phone on the AT&T telecommunications network line.

My phone has been locked out and locked down. Wrongfully. Criminally.

Now it is time for war.

When you attack me, expect to be annihilated, because that is what I do to my enemies, I annihilate them. Legally. Completely. Wait for it!

I had been a customer of Cricket Wireless for more than six years, a very satisfied and loyal customer with not a single payment ever in error or late. In fact, I have been on the autopay, automatic payment plan since the get-go. I was always happy with the Cricket Wireless service… until now. The lockout horror.

Likewise, I have been a loyal customer of AT&T for more than fifty years, a half century and I come from a family who has been loyal customers of AT&T for more than a full century.

I still have letters from decades ago from AT&T when they were the only long-distance telephone company in existence, appreciating the outstanding customer I had been to them for all the years of their service.

So, WTF?

Tech tyrants control our lives at an ever-increasing rate and many of us are furious with our government for not protecting us from them.

These tech tyrants often offer no solutions for resolutions to the many problems they cause. That is the case with the current situation with Cricket Wireless, a tyrant bully which will soon be torn from its throne and crushed beneath the feet of justice. Legally. Wait for it!

If government’s first job is to protect and serve the people, why then aren’t tech companies, including telephone communications corporations regulated against abusing their users?

Why does the government allow tech companies, especially wireless telecommunications, telephone communication corporations like Cricket Wireless, Leap Wireless, AT&T, and others, control our lives and practically everything in it, by having the capability of locking out our devices for any reason other than lack of payment?

I’m speaking specifically of SIM locks, PUK locks and Screen Locks, not service locks.

Verizon Wireless and its parent Verizon communications only locks for the first 60 days after activation and the company claims it never locks the phone thereafter, so this is NOT the same thing we speak about here. Verizon-Yahoo, however, is guilty of much more serious crimes and corruptions which we will soon discuss in massive, multiple publications concerning their deletion of users’ email.  Wait for it!

I recently made a mistake, as thousands of other users before and after me have, and wrongfully set a SIM pin number in error triggering my phone to be locked by Cricket Wireless with zero recourse to rectify or correct, and caused inaccessible conditions to my phone, locking me out, without averting prolonged and massive brain damage to get it unlocked again. Then it locked again, without warning or reason and the same BS started all over again, renewed.

There was no warning. No instructions. Just tyranny. The kind of tyranny that causes an entire industry to collapse and the CEOs having no place to run or hide from justice. Wait for it!

I have a story. It’s a long story. A series, even, coupled with other corporate tyrants of like interest and behaviors. It’s a story that will be told in Blogs & eBooks about Cricket Wireless’ tyrant reign over its loyal users and AT&T’s failure to rein in its subordinate’s criminal and wrongful acts of tyranny and predator behavior by its operating companies. Wait for it!



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